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This page is for those who go on deployment.  Below is advice given from people previously deployed.  Deployment is a critical part of H.E.A.R.T. though not a requirement.  People are signed up on the deployment list as they are able to go.  Flexibility is available; you can sign up strictly for summer months, etc.  The deployment list is in continual flux. 

 

Advise from our volunteers who traveled to Miami, Oklahoma to help out as flood waters receded.

 

 

miamiflteam

           

            Supplies

            Good socks, tall socks, and lots of them

                        Ski socks, something that can wick the moisture away

            Bring a towel

                        You may have to sleep on site, but usually there will be a

                        shower available

            Aspirin, Advil, Aleve, etc

What ever over the counter medication you are used to taking.  Chance are you are not going to have a chance to go the the store for headache medication.

            Mole Skin

                        You are going to get blisters, come prepared

            Mosquito Repellant

            Hand wipes

            BDU’s at least two pairs

A washing machine may not be handy and at the end of a couple of days your BDU’s may be able to walk themselves home

            Day pack

Bring something smaller to carry daily supplies in.  You won’t be able to lug your suitcase everywhere and you will want something larger than a purse to bring extra socks, water, medication, etc to the site

            First aid Kit

            Water bottle

            Credit card with space

You will be reimbursed, but often it won’t be at that instance, so come prepared

 

            Everything Else

 

·        Come with a can-do attitude.  This is not going to be easy, it is a disaster area.  Things may not be ran as well as you think they should be, unfortunately, you are there to assist, not run the show.  Help in the most areas you can and realize, eventually, it will all come together.

·        Make sure you are keeping up on communication.  Both within the group and back home.  Cell phones are very important.  If you have one you really should bring it and use it.  Sometimes the group may be split up and cell phones are an excellent way to stay in communication with one another.

·        You are going to break down, realize it, accept it, and don’t view it as a failure.  Everyone breaks down and it helps to just let it happen.

·        Accept everyone’s weaknesses and strengths.  There are going to be a lot of alpha personalities and you have to work together.  Realize your own strengths and weaknesses and use that to your advantage.

·        Days are longer than you think, prepare for that.

·        If you have a chance before you go look up the area you are going to.  Especially noteworthy is the zoonotic diseases.  Know what animals generally carry there and what you have to worry about. 

 

 

Advise from National Volunteers Across the Nation

Things generally forgotten and very helpful to bring

 

  • A small pair of wire cutters to cut zip ties off cages etc
  • Lip balm
  • Tiny tv/radio that can run off car batteries or rechargeable batteries; can feel isolated from the world rather fast
  • Shower flip-flops
  • Prepare for any type of weather: sweatshirt and tee shirts
  • Space emergency blanket, excellent for animals or used inside a sleeping bag
  • Mosquito netting, well worth it if you have to sleep outside

 

 

IFAW Suggested Ready Bag

Basics

  • compass with mirror
  • note pad and pencils
  • Sharpie-type marker 
  • flagging tape
  • headlamp or flashlight, extra batteries, spare bulb
  • eye protection
  • sunscreen and/or insect repellant
  • whistle
  • nylon rope (20’ of 7mm)
  • map(s)
  • large transparent bag for map(s)
  • GPS with extra batteries
  • flashlight(s)

Survival

  • toilet paper in ziploc
  • multitool (e.g., Leatherman)
  • good sheath knife or hatchet
  • waterproof matches
  • fire starter (paraffin-soaked sawdust or dryer lint works)
  • water purification tablets
  • space blanket
  • candles
  • bear spray and/or bear bangers
  • flares
  • duct tape
  • safety pins
  • large orange garbage bag
  • $2.00 in change

Food (you may want to stock foods that do not require a stove – MREs)
High carbohydrate, high calorie foods are recommended, as are lots of munchies and snacks.

  • water bottles (about 2L capacity)
  • trail mix
  • instant oatmeal
  • energy bars
  • prepared meals (e.g., IMPs, MREs or Hotpacks, so a stove isn't necessary)
  • soup mix, dehydrated meals
  • stove and fuel
  • cooking pot
  • knife, fork & spoon
  • powdered drink
  • fruit leather

Shelter

  • tarpaulin, tube tent, or space blanket
  • sleeping bag or bivouac sac
  • thermorest or ensolite pad
  • parachute cord (50’)
  • spare stuff sacks

First aid kit

  • A good quality Outdoorsman model

Personal

  • personal medication; tell team members about relevant medical conditions!
  • toothbrush and toothpaste
  • waterless hand cleaner
  • hand sanitizer
  • hairbrush or comb
  • razor
  • deodorant
  • tampons or sanitary pads (with ziplocs for packing out used ones)

Clothing
Synthetic materials are generally superior to natural fibers.  Clothes packed by season.

  • fluorescent baseball cap
  • Tilley-type hat for protection against rain and sun
  • bug hat
  • sunglasses
  • spare eyeglasses
  • long-sleeve shirt
  • yellow T-shirt
  • rain jacket/pants
  • thin leather gloves (especially for rope team members)
  • underwear
  • cargo pants
  • ** jeans are strongly discouraged because they absorb so much water
  • socks, thin and thick (at least 2 sets)
  • gaiters
  • waterproof hiking boots



 

American Humane Association Suggested “Go Kit”

aha

 

 

 

 

-Helps ensure you have everything you need and will reduce the amount of time between deployment and check-in

-Go Kits should sustain an individual for at least two days 

-Volunteers will be responsible for their own Go Kits and should therefore take care that the pack does not exceed a weight that would prevent them from carrying it under their own power…

LIST:

Two field shirts-will receive upon arrival to disaster scene. 

Two pairs BDU pants-should be able to tie down at bottom
       AHA recommends khaki or navy blue
       HEART recommends black or navy blue

One pair BDU shorts 

Four pairs of non-cotton socks

Four pairs of underwear

Rain Gear

Heavy jacket (in cold weather)

Light windbreaker

Gloves-rubber, leather work gloves, “Kevlar”

Towel-(microfiber)

Toilet items (toothbrush, soap, shaving items, feminine products, hair ties, etc.)

Personal first aid kit

Personal medications

Food (power bars, MRE’s, trail mix)

Flashlight with extra batteries

Multi function tool (Gerber, Leatherman)

Water container (camelback or canteen)

Water purification tablets or device

Compass

Office Supplies (tablet, pens, waterproof paper

Plastic bags (Ziploc)

Whistle

Hearing protection

Eye covers-(goggles, sunglasses)

Watch with second hand

Two large trash bags

Hat (for cold weather, a cap will be issued upon arrival on disaster scene.)

Personal protective items-(sunscreen, Chapstick, eyewash

Fire starter (waterproof matches)

Chemical light stick

Hand sanitizer

Boots

This list is a suggested list only!


 

 Dick Green’s suggested list for To-go bag

IFAW Suggested Ready Bag

Basics

Compass with mirror
note pad and pencils
flagging tape
headlamp or flashlight: extra batteries, spare bulb
sharpie
eye protection
sunscreen and/or insect repellent
whistle
nylon rope (20' of 7mm)
map(s)
large transparent bag for map(s)
GPS with extra batteries
Flashlight(s)

Survival
toilet paper in ziploc
multitool (e.g. leatherman)
good sheath knife or hatchet
waterproof matches
fire starter (paraffin soaked sawdust or vasaline cotton balls)
water purification tablets
space blanket
candles
bear spray and/or bear bangers
flares
duct tape
safety pins
large orange garbage bag
$2.00 in change

Food
High carbohydrate, high calorie foods are recommended, as are lots of munchies and snacks. 
water bottles (~2L capacity
trail mix
instant oatmean
energy bars
prepared meals (e.g. IMPs, MREs or Hotpacks, so a stove is not necessary)
soup mix; dehydrated meals
stove and fuel
cooking pot
knife, fork, and spoon
powdered drink
fruit leather

Shelter
tarpaulin, tube tent, or space blanket
sleeping bag or bivouac sac
thermorest or ensolite pad
parachute cord (50')
spare stuff sacks
first aid kit

Personal
Personal medication, tell team members about relevant medical conditions!
toothbrush and toothpaste
waterless hand cleaner
hand sanitizer
hairbrush or comb
razor 
deoderant
tampons or sanitary pads (with ziplocs for packing out used ones)
     side note to the ladies: even if it is not time for your period,  come prepared, a period will start with the onset of stress

Clothing
synthetic materials are generally superior to natural fibers
Pack by season
fluorescent baseball cap
Tilley-type hat for rain/sun protection
bug hat
sunglasses
spare eyeglasses
long-sleeved shirt
yellow t-shirt
rain jacket/pants
thin leather gloves
underwear
cargo pants
 *jeans strongly discouraged-absorb too much water*
socks (thin and thick-several sets)
gaiters

·     .


·  

    · Uniform Information

  fireman

Emergency Services volunteers must provide their own BDU (Battle Dress Uniform) Pants or Shorts and Black Boots 

AHA will provide field shirts and caps upon arrival to disaster scene.

BDU Information- tactical style cargo pants worn by police, military, animal control, etc. Minimum of two pair pants and two pair shorts is recommended. Khaki or navy blue (for HEART team black or navy blue). Pants should be worn during field work or when working directly with animals. Shorts are acceptable when working at critical resource centers or intake areas.

WHERE TO ORDER:

www.galls.com

Army Surplus

Bloomingthal (Spokane address-Howard 1306)

-black tactical pants, cottonpoly rip recently priced at $34.99.

Other ideas would be well received!  

Black Boots- Boots need to be waterproof and stiff toed (steel toes are optional)

WHERE TO ORDER:

General Store- 6 inch high boots

www.galls.com

Army Surplus

Sear’s men’s section

Bloomingthal-Atak 8 inch boots recently priced at $129.99 

NOTE: Bloomingthal has offered a 10% discount with a purchase of two items: mention the HEART team and speak with Mitch.

See address above

 

 

 

 

 

           

 

 

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